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Excerpts from

  How to Turn Your Desires
and Ideals into Realities

by Brown Landone




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CONTENTS

PREFACE - THE MAN WHO WORKED OUT THE PROCESS

PART A - DESIRE, IDEALS AND REALITIES
    CHAPTER 1 - WHAT DESIRES CAN YOU MAKE COME TRUE?
    CHAPTER 2 - CAN YOU, YOURSELF, MAKE YOUR IDEALS BECOME REALITIES

PART B - THE SPIRIT OF MATTER
    CHAPTER 3 - WHAT COMPACTNESS OF MATTER GIVES TO YOUR IDEALS
    CHAPTER 4 - WHAT ATTRACTIVE ENERGY OF MATTER GIVES TO YOUR DESIRES
    CHAPTER 5 - WHAT MOVEMENT IN MATTER GIVES TO THE BODY OF DESIRE


PART C - DESIRE-IDEALS AND THE PROCESS OF BECOMING REALITIES
    CHAPTER 6 - THE ONLY THREE ACTIVITIES NECESSARY
    CHAPTER 7 - TO ATTAIN YOUR DESIRES, ALL THREE MUST BE USED
    CHAPTER 8 - HOW TO FORM AN IDEAL THAT WILL COME TRUE
    CHAPTER 9 - FIRING THE HEART-DESIRE OF YOUR IDEAL
    CHAPTER 10 - GIVING A BODY OF ETHERIC SUBSTANCE TO YOUR IDEAL
    CHAPTER 11 - GIVING YOUR IDEAL THE IMPULSE OF ACTION TO MAKE IT REAL
    CHAPTER 12 - THE PROCESS THAT MAKES IDEALS COME TRUE
    CHAPTER 13 - THE ACT OF MAKING THE REALITY YOURS
    CHAPTER 14 - WHERE TO CENTER YOUR EFFORT


PART D - IDEALIZING THINGS
    CHAPTER 15 - IDEALIZED THINGS MAKE FORTUNES
    CHAPTER 16 - A BILLION DOLLARS BY IDEALIZING THE MOVEMENT OF THINGS


PART E - IDEALIZING MEANS AND METHODS
    CHAPTER 17 - BUILDING UP A SUCCESSFUL BUSINESS
    CHAPTER 18 - FIVE MINUTES IDEALIZING A DAY MAKES YOU SUPER-EFFICIENT
    CHAPTER 19 - TURNING DESIRES FOR SALES INTO ACTUAL SALES


PART F - PROPERTY VALUES DEPEND UPON IDEALS AND IDEALIZATION
    CHAPTER 20 - LAND VALUES INCREASE 400% IN FOUR DAYS
    CHAPTER 21 - VALUELESS WET LANDS MADE PROFITABLE BY IDEALIZATION


PART G - MAKING DESIRES OF POSITIONS AND ADVANCEMENT COME TRUE
    CHAPTER 22 - OBTAINING IN REALITY THE IDEAL POSITION YOU DESIRE
    CHAPTER 23 - ADVANCEMENT DEPENDS UPON IDEALIZING ITS PROCESS


PART H - THE HEALING OF SO-CALLED INCURABLE CASES
    CHAPTER 24 - MAKING A SOLID ANKLE JOINT FLEXIBLE AND USABLE
    CHAPTER 25 - HEALING A DYING MAN OF CANCER OF THE STOMACH
    CHAPTER 26 - CURING THE AFTERMATH OF FORTY YEARS OF REPRESSION


PART I - CHANGING CHARACTER AND ATTAINING SPIRITUAL CONSCIOUSNESS
    CHAPTER 27 - PREVENTING MISTAKES IN THINKING
    CHAPTER 28 - OVERCOMING FORGETFULNESS - IDEALIZING REMEMBERING
    CHAPTER 29 - CHANGING WEAK WILLS TO STRONG WILLS
    CHAPTER 30 - NORMAL MEANS OF ATTAINING SPIRITUAL CONSCIOUSNESS




PREFACE - THE MAN WHO WORKED OUT THE PROCESS

It is unusual I assume for a businessman to accept the obligation of writing a foreword to a book of idealism, and any attempt on my part to add to its spiritual content would be vain assumption. But since I know of the phenomenal results of idealizing the process, I can perhaps give some measure of faith and hope to those who have not always succeeded and who now doubt the possibility of making their ideals become realities.

My certainty of the results of this process bases itself upon many years' personal contact with the attainments of Brown Landone, upon my own individual and business success in using the process, and upon my intimate acquaintance with the many executives who have with his aid made their ideals come true. Some of these ideals have been of the higher things of life; some of more mundane affairs, such as increasing one's salary from two or three thousand a year to a thousand a month or more by a few weeks' use of the process.

Brown Landone, the man, like all of us, has his individual habits and hobbies known only to intimate friends. For instance, he never reads anything idealistic immediately before going to sleep. " If I do," he says, " my mind reacts and I have unpleasant dreams; but, if I read something weird, my soul reacts and I live the night in a state of high spiritual consciousness."

Then there is the passion of "cleaning up things." Today, this is most annoying to some of the intimate friends whom he visits, for no sooner is he in the home than he makes for the basement or attic to satisfy his soul's desire to make things clean. It is a passion with him; it was born in him. As a child he would clean up his playroom rather than play with his toys. When but five years old he became so angry because the servants would not let him mop the kitchen floors that he ran away from home!

Although handicapped in childhood and youth with what most of us consider insurmountable physical handicaps, yet he has lived long, worked much and retains enduring vitality. Those in whose time he first worked - Helen Wilmans, Dr. Adams, Mrs. Eddy, Dr. Stockham and others - have long since passed into the greater life. Yet, today (I know from years of association), he often works twenty hours out of twenty-four and finds life and the work a joy because he loves both. You and I may not wish to work thus, yet it gives one great consciousness of power to know that someone has attained such spiritual contact with Life that he is able to do so.

His recreation is painting. After a day's work, usually from eighteen to twenty hours, he paints to rest himself before going to sleep. He paints at such times with phenomenal rapidity.

He has worked much and all he has done or written is original. In point of fact, he has done so many original things that many find it difficult to keep track of his work. More than twenty years ago he wrote of the value of vitamins, now being accepted by the medical profession; a generation ago he proved the solar plexus to be a brain by itself, a statement then ridiculed by biologists but now accepted; seventeen years ago he discovered that tone is most resonantly projected on the parabolic curve and it is just now being used by engineers to secure valuable patents; within this decade he has formulated a new science of sociology which conservative French thinkers have called "epoch making." He was the first man to work out a new science of the arts unifying the basic principles of music, literature, painting, sculpture and architecture; to work out neural reaction; and to prove that new brain structure can be developed by conscious functioning just as Burbank proved that new plant structures can be developed.

In this book one thought deserves more than passing mention. During the centuries philosophers have sought the basis of the soul's faith in the unity of all things. Clearly to present that basis of unity is now, I know, Brown Landone's one great life aim. He may or may not succeed in making the world conscious of this unity, but at least the attempt in The Spirit of Matter comes nearer making us know that the spiritual and material world are one than anything written previously. With such a consciousness of the unity of all things of spirit and of matter, the faith is strong and the way is clear to make our ideals come true.
EDGAR H. FELIX - New York City, June, 1922.



PART A - DESIRE, IDEALS AND REALITIES


CHAPTER 1 - WHAT DESIRES CAN YOU MAKE COME TRUE?

Every desire is the heart of some ideal. Your desires always come true. Your wishes seldom do; they die by consuming themselves in forever wishing wishes. A desire with a body or an ideal with a heart always becomes a reality! Every desire is the heart center of some ideal that is either revealed to consciousness and understood or hidden in the ultra-consciousness and misunderstood. The ideal is the active body of the desire. Do not expect your desire to come true unless you give it a body. Construct an ideal that gives substance to each desire. Make the ideal active; - endow it with the process of attainment. Then, it will become a reality! It will come true!

But an “idea” is not an “ideal”! That is where your trouble often lies! Only a few - a very, very few - of your ideas ever come true. And very, very few of your thoughts and plans ever materialize if they are made up of ideas instead of ideals. An ideal always manifests itself in action and becomes a reality. Unless it does so, it is not an ideal.

In using the term “ideal” I am not conceiving any particular meaning of the word to fit my own philosophy; I am using the word as it is made definite by all dictionaries of the English language, - that is, that an ideal is a perfect image in the mind. An ideal differs from an idea. An idea is an image in the mind. An ideal is a perfect image in the mind. Every idea or ideal is composite, - it is made up of parts. Your idea of an orange includes, among a score of images: certain images of color, for you know it is not black; certain images of size, for you know an orange is not as small as a pinhead or as large as a watermelon; certain images of odor, it does not smell like an onion; and certain images of taste, for it does not taste like carrots or potatoes, pickles or chili-sauce.

An idea is imperfect because it lacks mind images which it should include and because it includes images which should not be included. Your idea of a certain person is imperfect because your idea of them does not include all the imaged qualities a perfect human should possess and includes imaged qualities that the perfect human should not manifest. But your perfect ideal of a person includes all of those qualities that such a person should possess and none of those, which they should not manifest.

An idea is not perfect; it is but a partial image, and lacking that something which is essential, seldom comes true. Usually the element an idea lacks is the very element that - if the idea possessed it - would make the idea manifest as a reality.

Differing from an idea, an ideal is a perfect image in the mind. It includes all of the component parts that it should include and it includes nothing that it should not include. Thus, in content and substance, it is perfect. Ideals are the substance of things that come true. Ideas are but mental skeletons; they are without heart and body, - they have no desire, no ideal.

Desire may be related to an idea or it may not. It is never a part of it. That is one of the elements an idea lacks. An ideal has always a heart of desire. That is one of the reasons why ideals come true. Mere ideas do not thrill the soul, urging and forcing man to action. Ideals, surging with desire and impelling to action, lead man to live, serve, sacrifice and die that his ideals may be made manifest as realities.

Your ideas seldom materialize. They lack desire and impulse to action. Ideals always come true. Change your ideas into ideals and they will become realities. It is easy for you to do so as soon as you know what it is the idea lacks. Thoughts formed of ideals become realities, - as surely as though they were conceived directly by God, Himself.

Which of your ideals can you make come true? Not one of them if they exist only as desires, for desire is but the soul's impulse to become real! But, give a desire a spiritual body - that is, embody it in an ideal - and it will always come true! For ideals are substance of things that are!

CHAPTER 2 - CAN YOU, YOURSELF, MAKE YOUR IDEALS BECOME REALITIES

Some of you are endowed with faith and some beset with doubt. Of those endowed with faith based upon spiritual knowledge, there is not one whose faith is not weakened a little by trifling doubts. Of those beset with the darkest of doubts, there is not one whose doubt is not enlightened a little by a touch of faith.

When I state that ideals come true none of you deny it or think of denying it. But, when I assure you that every ideal always comes true and that every one of your own particular ideals can be changed to a material reality, my statement contrasts so astoundingly with your past experiences of having tried faithfully to attain that which you desire, that some of you feel it can not be true, - some of you may doubt even my common sense in making such an assertion. You who doubt that every ideal comes true, doubt sincerely, - doubt because of common sense judgments based upon your present knowledge. No matter what the cause, doubt interferes with your realization of your ideals: it dampens the fire of desire and lessens your effort to attain that which you wish because you think the effort is useless.

I do not wish you to accept any statement; I wish you to know truth! Do not change from doubt to blind belief; it will do you no permanent good, - blind faith soon dies. But what are the “ideas” in your mind that make you doubt?

First, mistaking ideas for ideals.
Second, your idea of the density of matter.
Third, your idea of the solidity of matter.
Fourth, your idea of matter as motionless and lifeless.
Fifth, your present incomplete knowledge of the process of making ideals become realities.

These are the only serious causes of doubt, - five stones in the path of faith and attainment. I shall not, in succeeding chapters, give them more attention than they deserve, but just enough to remove them.

By and large, your doubt is based upon the seeming impossibility of etheric images of the mind being able easily to change, re-form and re-create the substance of matter that is seemingly so dense, solid and lifeless. If you could know that matter is not so dense as it seems, not so solid as it appears, not so lifeless as it is assumed to be - if you could know these things, then doubt would be faith and faith would be divinely certain, forever lasting, and ever impelling to action.

Most of your trouble, then, relates to your idea of the nature of matter - its substance and attributes. In what follows I shall not be so silly as to assert that matter does not exist, that it is a mere claim of matter, or that it is an illusion.

If I should assert that matter is non-existent, you could laugh at me and justly, - for I am so conscious of the existence of matter that I find it necessary to have a house in which to live, a bed in which to sleep, clothes to wear and food to eat.  If I should assert that matter is a mere claim of being matter, I would corner myself; when people owe me money, I am not content with the claim, - I prefer the money itself. If I should state that matter is an “illusion of the mind,” you could - knowing the certainty of the law that only like perceives like - smile to yourself over the idea that nothing but an illusionary mind could conceive an illusionary world, eat illusionary vegetables, wear illusionary shirts, handle illusionary money, use and depend upon ten thousand illusionary things and live upon an illusionary earth.

I hold that matter is existent and that it is very unwise and detrimental to deny its existence and attempt to live up to the denial, - for instance to deny the existence of material food and try to live without it. But, I hold also that it is lack of knowledge of the true nature of matter that makes us think of it as dense, solid, motionless and lifeless.

If in our greater knowledge of matter we find that it is only energy in reality, that it is not restricted energy but infinite energy, and that it is of the same substance as spirit - then our concept of matter becomes so like our concept of the substance of which ideals are made, that it is possible for us to perceive some definite connection - a real relation, perhaps a similarity, perhaps even a co-existence - of the substance of every ideal and the substance of every material reality.

With such knowledge - found in next succeeding chapters - our faith that ideals come true, because they are of the same substance as matter, can be and is justified. Such faith will fire anew our ideals and desires and impel us to cease no effort until they become realities; and with knowledge of the process of attainment, we shall know by experience that it is not so difficult as it once seemed. And you, yourself, can make your ideals become realities. Faith is the substance of things hoped for. Ideals are the substance of the things that are.


  "How to Turn Your Desires and Ideals into Realities "
by Brown Landone

Order in Adobe PDF eBook or printed form for $5.95 (+ printing charge)

 

or click here to order from Amazon.com for $17.12